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414 Canyon Road
Santa Fe, NM 87501
USA

(505) 982-2073

Join us at our beautiful Canyon Road gallery, located in the heart of historic Santa Fe! Mark White's kinetic wind sculptures populate the front and back gardens, creating an opportunity for reflection and meditation. 

Built in the 1700s, our gallery houses many mediums presented in new and exciting ways. View work by painters Javier Lopez-Barbosa, Ethan White, Mark White and Charles Veilleux. Our bold sculptors include jd Hansen, Ethan White and Mark White.

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Blog

News and current events at Mark White Fine Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A Studio Visit with Mark

Mark White

November is a bridge month - definitely fall, but also chilly enough to remind one of Winter's extreme temperatures. It's a lovely time for reflection and indoor activities, so what better opportunity than now to visit the studio of Mark White?

Finishing touches on Alluvial Heat (left) and Evening Glow (right) before these brilliantly colored works come home to our Canyon Road gallery.

Finishing touches on Alluvial Heat (left) and Evening Glow (right) before these brilliantly colored works come home to our Canyon Road gallery.

Tools of the trade 

Tools of the trade 

A messy palette yields the best colors!

A messy palette yields the best colors!

Like sun rays trapped on canvas, Mark's new orange and red paintings are fiery and super energetic.

Like sun rays trapped on canvas, Mark's new orange and red paintings are fiery and super energetic.

Mark uses squeeqees, sponges, trowels, and all kinds of tools to create his paintings.

Mark uses squeeqees, sponges, trowels, and all kinds of tools to create his paintings.

What did you call that?!

Mark White

Mark White's wind sculptures have lots of fans - and go by lots of different names! Here are some we've heard:

  • Wind vanes
  • Whirlygigs
  • Doohickeys
  • Windmills
  • Wind art
  • Weather vanes
  • Pinwheels
  • Spinners
  • Wind chimes
  • Twirly-whirls
  • Wind catchers
  • Wind talkers

What do you call them??

George Rickey and Alexander Calder: Wind Art Pioneers

Mark White

Sculptor Mark White has been making kinetic wind art for decades; over time, he's developed a style and creative practice all his own. Nevertheless, no artist works in a vacuum, and Mark is quick to acknowledge his creative influences.

Alexander Calder (1898-1976 with one of his famous mobiles.

Alexander Calder (1898-1976 with one of his famous mobiles.

The mobile sculpture of Alexander Calder is some of modern art's most immediately recognizable: delicate and finely balanced, Calder's quirkily shaped works respond to subtle shifts in wind currents. Mark admires Calder's use of bold shapes, which was a downright radical aspect of Calder's practice when initiated in the middle of the twentieth century. 

Alexander Calder's mobile "Yellow Sail" from 1951

Alexander Calder's mobile "Yellow Sail" from 1951

George Rickey (1907-2002) with a couple of his sculptures.

George Rickey (1907-2002) with a couple of his sculptures.

George Rickey was an important pioneer in the field of kinetic or wind-driven artwork. His sculptures, often monumental in size, make use of geometric, clearly defined shapes, that nevertheless take on an organic, placid elegance as they move in the wind. It's work that is still feels conceptually cutting-edge, while it maintains an organic, peaceful visual effect.

George Rickey's monumental sculpture "Two Rectangles" from 1987, installed in New Zealand.

George Rickey's monumental sculpture "Two Rectangles" from 1987, installed in New Zealand.

Which artist are you most drawn to? Can you think of any others who remind you of Mark?

Opening Night

Mark White

We had a great turnout for Mark White's opening last Friday, October 10th. Here are a few shots from the show. (For a full gallery of images, visit us on Facebook! 

A guest admires new paintings by Mark

A guest admires new paintings by Mark

Getting ready for the crowd

Getting ready for the crowd

Mark and a guest talk art

Mark and a guest talk art

A Heron at Home

Mark White

Preening, Mark White's waterfowl sculpture, has found a home! This bronze work is now part of a gorgeous water feature belonging to one of our clients in Southwestern North Carolina. 

Mark White Fine Art: Before & After

Mark White

Here in Santa Fe, we don't take history for granted. As the oldest capital city in the country, Santa Fe is filled with important landmarks that reflect New Mexico's multi-faceted cultures and rich past. A great place to see the city as it was a hundred or more years ago is Canyon Road. Famous for its art galleries, the storied street was home to schools, bars, and dozens of private residences for generations. A bit of digging revealed that 414 Canyon Road - which is now Mark White Fine Art - is considered by some local historians as the oldest continually-inhabited building on all of Canyon! Read more on that here: Mark White Fine Art might be housed in the oldest building on Canyon Road!

Mark White Fine Art before it was purchased by the current owners.

Mark White Fine Art before it was purchased by the current owners.

Mark White Fine Art today!

Mark White Fine Art today!

Gorgeous Installation Photos from Alamogordo!

Mark White

From our clients in the south-central New Mexican town of Alamogordo (the city calls itself "The Friendliest City in the World"!):

Hello;

After we purchased the Jellyfish sculpture, Alvin asked if we could send some pics once it was installed. So, here ya go. We love all 3.

Our home is in Alamogordo and is backed by wide open spaces and on frequent occasions, amazing skies. I’m not a professional photographer but I hope you get the idea with the few that I’m sharing with you.

Ken and Judy Allen

Thanks so much Ken and Judy! Your display is gorgeous.

Autumnal new paintings!

Mark White

Mark White, Leaves Near Water, oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches, $800

Mark White, Leaves Near Water, oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches, $800

Mark White, Pond's Grassy Edge II, oil on canvas, 20  x 10 inches, $1,100

Mark White, Pond's Grassy Edge II, oil on canvas, 20  x 10 inches, $1,100

What says fall like the warm, rich oranges and shimmery golds in the works above - two of Mark's very latest paintings. We've already hung them up...can you blame us?! 

We <3 Our TripAdvisor Reviewers!

Mark White

It's always a special treat to stumble across kind words from clients and visitors who take the time to write reviews of their experiences in our gallery. TripAdvisor.com has over 1,000 reviews of Canyon Road, where our gallery is located! Here are a few that specifically mention Yours Truly:

Thanks for the kind words, Tim, Jane, and Larry! 

A Rose by Any Other Name

Mark White

Many of our kinetic sculptures have names that reference flowers. Given their gentle, swaying motion in the wind, they naturally recall breeze-blown flowers. We thought we'd see just how similar the kinetic model is to the flower it's named for:

The classic purple iris

The classic purple iris

Our interpretation of an iris!

Our interpretation of an iris!

A pale lily in bloom

A pale lily in bloom

Mark White's Blooming Lily moves with balletic grace!

Mark White's Blooming Lily moves with balletic grace!

A red rose - is anything more symbolic of romance?

A red rose - is anything more symbolic of romance?

Here's Mark White's interpretation of the rose: pared-down, but still evocative of the many-petaled flower.

Here's Mark White's interpretation of the rose: pared-down, but still evocative of the many-petaled flower.

A poppy bud about to burst.

A poppy bud about to burst.

Mark White's poppy is simple and pretty.

Mark White's poppy is simple and pretty.

The mighty dahlia!

The mighty dahlia!

This interpretation of the dahlia features dense layers of red and verdigris petals.

This interpretation of the dahlia features dense layers of red and verdigris petals.

ok, this isn't a flower, but you can't help but see the resemblance between a flickering flame and Mark's sculpture of the same name...

ok, this isn't a flower, but you can't help but see the resemblance between a flickering flame and Mark's sculpture of the same name...

Our "Flame" sculpture is clearly named well...!

Our "Flame" sculpture is clearly named well...!

A golden jellyfish

A golden jellyfish

...and Mark White's red version of a jellyfish!

...and Mark White's red version of a jellyfish!

Tidbit of History from the Netherlands!

Mark White

A red Iris in a Dutch garden!

A red Iris in a Dutch garden!

Our customers are the best in the world - in this case, quite literally! Rob from the Netherlands sent us the above picture of his newly installed kinetic Iris sculpture, and he gave us a history lesson too!

I promised to send you a picture of the kinetic sculpture Iris you sold us in November 2013.

Well, here she is, in our garden in Milsbeek, the Netherlands. She feels at home and happy  and as we live close to Germany she is at least bilingual. Her Dutch is fluent and her German is on a high level. She is not forgetting her American native language, but it is getting a bit rusty. In the background you see a herd of cows and a hill. Behind that hill is Germany. About one mile from here is the place where on the 17th of September 1944 the 82nd Airborne Division under the command of General James Gavin landed. It is a historical place. I went to that place often when I worked as a guide in the nearby National Liberation Museum in Groesbeek, to show this site to visiting Americans.This is the place where operation Market Garden started...many Americans died during this operation. Among them were 48 soldiers who were killed when crossing the Waal river near Nijmegen´ about 9 miles from here, in canvas boats under heavy German fire. It was a very courageous operation. We now have an impressive monument that reminds us of these brave man. In 2013 a new bridge over the Waal river was opened. It is called ‘de Oversteek’. In English: "the Crossing." Special about this bridge is the lighting. It has 48 lamp-posts. Each and every night they are lit two by two in the tempo of a slow march, to commemorate those fallen 48 Americans, who came all the way from the US to liberate our country. After those 48 lamp-posts are lit, the rest of the lights in town are switched on. 

Kindly, Rob P.

How cool is that?! We love stories and pictures from our clients. Send yours to info@markwhitefineart.com!

Focus On: Grant Wood

Mark White

One of Mark's most popular works from his WE sculpture series is titled Homage to Grant Wood. Most people instantly recognize this quintessentially American pose - a couple side by side, the man holding a pitchfork aloft. The artist of the original painting is Grant Wood, who was born in Iowa and spent most of his life there. 

Mark's interpretation of American Gothic is pared-down, with slick lines and elongated forms. Nevertheless, it bears an unmistakable resemblance to the oil painting below. 

Mark's interpretation of American Gothic is pared-down, with slick lines and elongated forms. Nevertheless, it bears an unmistakable resemblance to the oil painting below. 

Grant Wood, American Gothic, 1930, oil on canvas, collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. Note the interesting details: the farmer's pitchfork is mimicked on the smock of his overalls. The lace curtains in the top window have polka dots similar to those on the woman's apron. These subtle details reinforce traditional male/female roles of rural America - the lace is soft and domestic, the sharp pitchfork suggests a masculine industriousness. 

Grant Wood, American Gothic, 1930, oil on canvas, collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Note the interesting details: the farmer's pitchfork is mimicked on the smock of his overalls. The lace curtains in the top window have polka dots similar to those on the woman's apron. These subtle details reinforce traditional male/female roles of rural America - the lace is soft and domestic, the sharp pitchfork suggests a masculine industriousness. 

The models for American Gothic: do you think they're trying to mimic the serious faces in the painting? Something tells me they are. Look at the man's very subtle smile!

The models for American Gothic: do you think they're trying to mimic the serious faces in the painting? Something tells me they are. Look at the man's very subtle smile!

Most people don't know that the painting was originally inspired by the building in the background, a Gothic-style farmland building. The painting shows a farmer standing beside his unmarried daughter, but in reality the woman pictured was Grant Wood's sister Nan, standing beside their family dentist, Dr. Byron McKeeby. 

Mark White started his WE sculpture series in response to the political distinction of the "99%", signifying unequal wealth distribution in America and elsewhere. A clear parallel exists for Wood's portrait, which was made in the early days of the Great Depression.

Newest Fountain at Mark White!

Mark White

Our sculpture garden has a brand-new addition: Cascading, a fountain constructed of perforated stainless steel. Water bubbles up and over the top of the piece, flowing in gentle rivulets around the circular body of the sculpture, and splashes gently onto stones below.

And here is another angle of Cascading, this time obscured slightly by shadows. It's remarkable to see how the holes in the stainless steel casing effect the water's movement, which catches and ripples over the textured metal surface on its descent to the ground.